Dunyeats Heath

Prior to video visit to Dunyeats Heath Nature Reserve, I had gone the previous weekend, on my second only trip there.  It turned out much better than the first one ( where I saw nothing ).  This time though it was a hot sunny day, and the pond and reserve were buzzing with Damselflies, Dragonflies and other insects.  Approaching the pond that is near one of the entrances, lots of small frogs were hopping around at the edge.  Getting one to stay still enough for a shot or two was a challenge, but I did manage this one.

Froglet
Froglet

Froglet.  Taken on Canon 650D with Canon 100mm USM Macro Lens.  ISO 400 F5.6 1/400 in Natural Light.

The sun had also super charged the insects, and a lot of following and approaching to no avail occurred.  However this darter, could not move – it had lost a wing, and also had a damaged eye.  I assume it had a bad emergence.

Darter with damaged eye
Darter with damaged eye

Darter with damaged eye.  Taken on Canon 650D with Canon 100mm USM Macro Lens.  ISO 400 F5.6 1/320 in Natural Light.

Finally, I managed to get close to this Four-spotted Chaser, that was sunning itself on the top of a reed stem.  I took it from two sides, one with the trees in the background, and then the other two looking over towards the pond.

Four-spotted Chaser (1)
Four-spotted Chaser (1)

Four-spotted Chaser (1). Taken on Canon 650D with Canon 100mm USM Macro Lens.  ISO 400 F5.6 1/640 in Natural Light.

Four-spotted Chaser (2)
Four-spotted Chaser (2)

Four-spotted Chaser (2). Taken on Canon 650D with Canon 100mm USM Macro Lens.  ISO 400 F5.6 1/500 in Natural Light.

Four-spotted Chaser (3)
Four-spotted Chaser (3)

Four-spotted Chaser (3). Taken on Canon 650D with Canon 100mm USM Macro Lens.  ISO 400 F5.6 1/400 in Natural Light.

Map of Location

 

Chris

I've been taking macro photography from 2004. I use both Canon film and digital cameras.

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